Tuesday, June 10, 2008

The Pest I Love To Hate

I was always told that hate is a bad word. While you may dislike someone or something, you shouldn’t use the word hate to describe your extreme dislike. However, from time to time I bend the rules – the law according to Debra.

As usual, Darlene and I were on the lookout for interesting photo opportunities today as we walked around the pond at Madison Park. Last night’s storms caused a light breeze and slight downturn in temps and humidity, making our stroll quite pleasant. That was until I spotted an insect that I HATE. Yes, I can say hate without feeling guilty because there is nothing redeeming about this highly destructive pest. Can you guess which one of the following photos illustrates the bug of my extreme dislike?


If you guessed the last photo, you’re correct. The Japanese beetle was accidentally introduced into the United States from Japan about 1916, probably as larvae in the soil around imported plants. The Japanese beetle is a highly destructive plant pest that can be very difficult and expensive to control. Feeding on grass roots, Japanese beetle grubs damage lawns, golf courses, and pastures. Japanese beetle adults attack the foliage, flowers, or fruits of more than 300 different ornamental and agricultural plants. Gregarious in nature, Japanese beetle adults are often found feeding in masses on a few plants, leaving others nearby uninfested. The adults are skeletonizers, that is, they eat the leaf tissue between the leaf veins but leave the veins behind. Attacked leaves look like lace that soon withers and dies. The homeowner association in our previous neighborhood imposed a special assessment whereas every property had a treatment of the highly effective milky spore to combat the beetle larvae. It worked quite well. Since we moved to a new neighborhood, we have no neighbors around us yet. We have open fields on three sides with a forested area to our back. I walked around the yard after coming home from work and saw no evidence of Japanese beetles – yet. But they’re coming. And I HATE them!

8 comments:

Janette said...

Once again great job with those photos. I loveeeeee dragonflies, so to me those are the best! =) I had about four of them flying around our fishpond yesterday. They would hardly sit still long enough for me to get a photo. But I did get a few. But not as close as yours!

Chere said...

I second your comment. I hate those little buggers. I have not problem stepping on them. CRUNCH! I have spent years battling them. They can destroy plants in no time at all. They are very hard to get rid of unless the whole area treats for them. Your other photos are beautiful.

Judyann said...

I'm not a fan of the Japanese Beetles either. Don't seem to have them here at this house and that's just fine by me. Again, great photos.

Tondalayo Breckenridge said...

My personal opinion is the Japanese people are still a little miffed about the whole Hiroshima/Nagasaki thing so they came up with this Beetle idea(which they got from either the German car company or Ringo Starr I think I heard). Anyway, I rate biting horseflies and mosquitos ahead of Japanese Beetles on the hit list. Beetles don't leave marks like horseflies and mosquitos unless the smack you with those little tiny chop sticks.

Jamie Payne said...

Oh doughboy...you're just so funny! Yes, that last post has Peter Bradley written all over it:) Great photos mom!

Roxanne Schwandt said...

Oh the nerve of those nasty little creatures. How dare they destroy the beauty of nature! I sure hope you can keep them at bay at your new house!
As always, great pics of everything. How do you do that? Bugs just fly away from me... which is fine as long as they don't land on my arm!

Pamela G. said...

Wonderful pictures, even if the subject is "hated". I love your photography. VERY PROFESSIONAL! There's a second career just waiting...

Country Girl said...

I know! I guessed it right away. They're here in Maryland and I just noticed them today when I pulled some off my hanging basket on the mudroom porch. I hate them as much as I hate flies.